CANAV’s Late Winter BLOG for Early 2022!

This quintessential CF-100 photo shows prototype 18101 from a wonderful angle. One of history’s great CF-100 photos, right! Avro always had the best photographers, and this image says it all. In this era the fellows normally used the Avro Jetliner, a Lancaster or a B-25 as their photo ship. The CF-100 made its first flight on January 19, 1950 (72 years ago) with the great Bill Waterton at the controls (see Bill’s excellent book The Quick and the Dead). It then evolved into one of the famous “Fighters of the Fifties”. Deliveries totalled 692 by 1958. The last CF-100s retired in 1981 from 414 Sqn at a great event in North Bay, which hundreds of us attended. Happily, many CF-100s have been preserved. You can google this recent CBC item to see how one is getting a long-overdue facelift this year: Historic Canadian aircraft set to get a facelift, courtesy of the City of Moncton

Welcome to the CANAV Books blog for February 2022. As usual, there’s a lot to cover. You can start right here by downloading our Spring/Summer 2022 Booklist. Any reader will find something enticing — guaranteed! For one thing, you’ll spot some excellent Avro Canada books, including a top new CF-100 history, Canadian Cold Warriors. “CCW” nicely complements the Jan Zurakowsi and Bill Waterton test pilot autobiographies. Chris Gainor’s Who Killed the Avro Arrow caps off this selection. There’s also Paul Ozorak’s new Abandoned Military Installations of Canada, Vol.4, a massive production for anyone with the least interest. Covering Gander in wartime, North Atlantic Crossroads is another gem. What else? Any Canadiana reader will revel in The Company, ditto for Chris Hadfield’s Apollo Murders. And don’t miss our special offers on Canada’s Air Force at War and Peace and Air Transport in Canada, two monumental and legendary Canadian aviation book publishing projects that are beloved anchors in many an aviation home library. Here’s your list … have at it!

Russian assault on Antonov airport February 24. If you google these bits, you should be able to see these dramatic scenes as Russian commandos take the airport by helicopter assault. Not a happy sight — so far not a single nation is willing to help Ukraine. Putin has the world terrorized. pic.twitter.com/SnvmwQ1Ge

t.me/operativnoZS

9:03 AM · Feb 24, 2022·Twitter Web App

Two of our top new titles this season.

Vintage Canadian Aviation

It’s not too well known by 2022, but Canada had an aviation industry as long ago as 1915, when Glenn H. Curtiss established a small factory and flying school in Toronto. In late 1916 this was taken over for wartime needs by the Imperial Munitions Board, which turned out more than 2000 Curtiss JN-4 airframes in the city’s west end. Through the 1920s other companies got into the business, including De Havilland in Toronto and Canadian Vickers in Montreal. By 1930 there was a blossoming industry, one of several Montreal companies being Reid Aircraft at Cartierville Airport. Founded early in 1928, at year’s end it was acquired by Curtiss, to become Curtiss-Reid Aircraft Co. Only one production design was turned out – the Rambler, a tandem 2-seater that for some years was an important club and RCAF trainer. According to the great K.M. Molson’s seminal book, Canadian Aircraft since 1909, 43 Ramblers were built. These were powered by D.H. engines of 80, 90 or 120 hp. Unfortunately , the Depression by then was getting into full swing. Even with its US backing, Curtiss-Reid did not make it and folded in 1933. Shown is Rambler CF-ABO in an evocative Cartierville scene. Built in 1928, “ABO” was short-lived, being wrecked in an accident on October 6, 1930. The Curtiss-Reid hangars beyond survived into modern times. I remember them from the 1960s, but am not sure when they finally went. No original Rambler exists, although the outstanding Montreal Aviation Museum has created an excellent replica that has a few original parts. Definitely tour the MAM website: https://www.mam.quebec › discover-our- museum-2
Our second vintage photo for this session is a rare aerial view of Vancouver Airport c.1930. I have no idea how this tiny, original print got into my collection eons ago, but it’s sure worth a look in 2022. Beyond the new terminal building is the Lower Fraser River and miles of farmland, which today make up the sprawling Vancouver suburb of Richmond, where a tiny patch of land sells these days for $1 million. The cornerstone for Vancouver’s modern terminal building was laid on September 13, 1930, then the airport opened the following July 22. For 1931 the original “YVR” welcomed 536 passengers on 309 flights. The basic source of all such history is Tom McGrath’s incomparable 1992 book, History of Canadian Airports. Do yourself a favour and find yourself a copy.

Old Hamilton Airport

If you scroll back you can find one of our more popular blog items, “Old Hamilton Airport”. Why this topic again? Mainly because a few fascinating archival photos have surfaced in one of my dusty old Fred Hotson files. For any fan of Canada’s early airports, you’ll enjoy today’s aerial view of this long ago redeveloped urban landscape (see Tom McGrath’s book for details). Dated June 30, 1937, this original 8×10 was taken by a long-forgotten Toronto company called “Airmaps Limited”. Great name, eh! This is one of those delightful old photos that interested folks love to sit and stare at. The longest runway seen here measured about 2800 feet. Wouldn’t it be interesting to have a photo from the same vantage point as per 2022?
Here’s another photo at old Hamilton Airport, this one c.1940. This style of stacking planes allowed a lot more to be kept inside. Some of these planes? CF-AWF Taylor E-2 Cub probably when W. Nixon of Woodstock owned it; CF-BGE Taylor J-2 Cub owned by Fred Gillies of St. Catharines; RCAF Stinson 105 No.3486; and J-3 Cub CF-BOU. “BOU” ended badly, crashing vertically into a farm field near Campbellford, Ontario (east of Peterborough) on October 24, 1956. Owner George Stafford age 30 and Gary Stapley age 17 died. Young Gary recently had earned his wings and his father had just purchased him his own Cub. George had his own airstrip near Campbellford from where he did some flying instructing, and where several local people kept their planes. Formerly in the RCAF, George had flown during the war as an air gunner. No reason for the crash ever was found.
Here are two ancient gems from my ever-fascinating Fred Hotson files. First, a spectacular scene with G-CAOT, one of the few Loening 23 Air Yachts (three of about 15 manufactured served in Canada). Designed in the early 1920s by Grover Loening, the Model 23 used a 400-hp Liberty engine, similar to that in the OPAS’s HS-2L fleet. The design concept was unique: instead of being an integral flying boat, the Model 23 cabin, wings and engine were mated to a flying boat hull. G-CAOT was purchased from Loening in New York City in January 1926, but was wrecked one day following a hard landing on Ramsay Lake in July 1927. Then, probably the most modern airplane to visit Canada this year — the Cities Service Oil Company’s DC-2 NC1000 at the Toronto Flying Club’s North Toronto airstrip on October 19, 1934. NC1000 went to Pan American Airways in 1939 and later (1942) to South American owners. Eventually, it was seized for smuggling and went for scrap in 1951. But … in this scene it was a marvel of modern aeronautics to behold.

More Oldies — Wartime National Film Board Aviation Short

During WWII, Canada’s National Film Board’s primary job was turning out propaganda shorts. 75-80 years later these are a window on the day’s documentary standards from storyline to editing and presentation. By today’s standards, the acting seems almost ridiculous in how the NFB narrators (this one is the great Lorne Greene) put across their message in that panicky style of the times, but that was then and this is now. Here’s a good example of the NFB’s wartime effort. I’m sure you’ll be able to overlook the aggravating presentation to enjoy the fascinating film clips from Canadian aviation “way back in the day”. Google it at:

45594 1942 ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE DEVELOPMENT OF

More Martin Martin News: The mighty Mars miracle

Cargo Airlines Post-WWII

In Air Transport in Canada all of our post-WWII air carriers are covered in decent detail, for such a general book. You see all about the roots of such carriers as Maritime Central Airlines, Mont Laurier Aviation, Wheeler Airlines, Transair, Queen Charlotte Airlines, etc. for which air cargo was so important. “ATC” provides solid background for what was happening – the war was over, surplus airplanes were available, markets beckoned (or did they?), on and on. To the credit of the visionaries, many companies survived for decades, until gradually absorbed into larger ones. If this sort of business/aviation story interests you, there are good books to track down. Besides “ATC” for the Canadian story, two of my favourites are R.E.G. Davies Airlines of the United States since 1914 and Commuter Airlines of the United States, but so far I’ve yet to see a book about the US postwar cargo airlines. Is this one in the works? Here’s an excellent old movie covering Sante Fe Skyway, a short-lived 1940s carrier with DC-3s and DC-4s. It’s an excellent business case study and the ancient propliner footage is not to be missed. Sante Fe Skyway reminds me of such great Canadian companies as QCA and World Wide Airways. For an informative and enjoyable 18 minutes, google The Failure of Santa Fe Skyway – YouTube

More of Les Corness’ Unique Photography

Two ex-RCAF P-40 Kittyhawks that Les Corness spotted at Edmonton “Muni” on July 18, 1968, a time when such rusty old wrecks still went to the scrap yard. This was at the beginning of the serious warbirds movement in Canada, when pilots and mechanics showing an interest in such exotic planes were considered a bit eccentric. Now we realize what a debt we owe those pioneers. Where are these historic old Kittyhawks in 2022?

Any time I glance through a pile of old Les Corness transparencies from the 50s, I spot many that I’d like to share. Regardless of their sometimes rough condition with scratches and crud, or Les’ preference (when called for) to favour content over form, there’s always something inspirational about his photos. You’ll know what I mean if you have your copy of The Leslie Corness Propliner Collection (if you don’t, see the booklist for a great deal). Also, you can search for earlier blog items featuring Les, this item included: “Leslie Corness Propliner Review” which features lots more of his magnificent photos.

During his years toiling in the High Arctic, Les went through many rolls of Kodachrome. If a subject looked interesting, he got out his 35mm range-finder and shot off at least a frame, even if at too great a distance to make for a prize- winning photo. Case in point … this abandoned Avro York freighter at Hall Beach, NWT on June 15, 1957.
At Hall Beach the same day, Les grabbed this distant photo of one of the most legendary DEW Line freighters, DC-3 CF-JIZ “Arctic Rose” of Don McVicar’s Dorval-based World Wide Airways. Problem? Blurred DC-3, but any view of this famous plane is fascinating for the true fans. After all, this gives a good idea of the colours for the next modeller to built “JIZ”, or, the next artist to start a painting. A photo that’s a “dog” to some perfectionist can be the solution to someone else’s niggling question about paint details. Arctic pilot Tony Jarvis adds about this scene: “Hall Beach was the settlement and the Dew Line site there was Fox Main. Many years later I dug through the York site was and recovered the instrument panel, which you photographed in Yellowknife. CF-HFQ was the first Avro York brought into Canada for Arctic work.”
An everyday scene at Frobisher on July 25, 1957. One of Kenting’s Oshawa- based, aerial survey B-17s has dropped by, and a USAF Grumman Albatross is getting ready for a transit maybe up to Thule, or it could be on a search. A USAF C-54 is off on its next long leg north to Thule, east across the pond, or back south. This exact line of hills could be used today to frame a photo of something like a 737, ATR or Dash 8 taking off.
Les appreciated the close-up. This RCAF Neptune was in Frobisher Bay on a search on November 17, 1958, when Les got interested in its big engine heaters steaming away, so he snapped off a frame. Then his excellent detail shot out the window when he was a spotter in RCAF Lancaster FM122 on a search of November 4, 1958. What you see below is pure Baffinland. Having flown once each in the North Star and Lancaster, I still can here the roar of those Merlins!
Every airplane was a photo op for Les. He’d have been ecstatic this day (May 22, 1959) when nine ex-RCAF Expeditors passed through Frobisher with their C-47 mother ship on the way to France. (Canada recently had gifted a large number of “Exploders” to France, where they gave years of good service.) Even though the day was bleak for photography, Les didn’t let this historic moment pass.
Les’ postwar photo of Lancaster FM159 in Nanton, Alberta. This old relic subsequently was saved and meticulously restored by the Bomber Command Museum of Canada in Nanton. Today all its engines are serviceable. For the detailed story of FM159, google Dave O’Malley’s superb history — LAST CALL FOR LANCASTERS – Vintage Wings of Canada
In September 1980 Les photographed this rare ex-RCAF CF-100 Mk.IVB at the Imperial War Museum at Duxford. Behind is Britain’s great technological wonder, the TSR-2, which was terminated at the height of the Cold War due to budget and technical issues. Writer David Nolan has commented about the TSR program: “Nearly 50 years later, TSR-2 cultists still talk of conspiracies, cover-ups, and sinister U.S. efforts to sabotage the project.” Sound familiar? Isn’t this exactly what we never stop hearing from Canada’s Arrowmaniacs – those “cultists” who’ve never done any actual research into the demise of the Arrow? Then, a lovely Wilf White photo of 18393 while in squadron service. Wilf spotted it one day c.1960 at Scottish Aviation Ltd. at Prestwick. It looks factory fresh, so could be on its delivery flight from Avro, or, maybe it’s right out of overhaul at SAL. Happily, it evaded the breaker’s torch.

RCAF Procurement

Northrop Delta NC13777, the Richfield Oil Company’s speedy executive plane c.1930. For high-class air travel, the “Richfield Eagle” would have had no rival for several years in speed, comfort and ability to “impress the Joneses”. You may see NC13777 today in the National Airline History Museum in Kansas City, MO. The civil Delta became the basis for one of the RCAF’s first modern airplanes 85+ years ago. (William J. Wheeler Col.)

Over the decades CAF/RCAF aircraft procurement has been a subject of discussion, analysis and befuddlement. Project timelines themselves have been mindboggling at times. How long, for example, long did it take to replace the Argus? It seems that since the late 1960s the Argus was going to be “replaced”. Finally, the Aurora arrived at Greenwood in 1980. So it went with the F-104/CF-5/CF-101 replacement, which culminated with the delivery in 1982 of Canada’s first CF-188 Hornets. Then there was the Sea King replacement, which finally has arrived in the form of the Cyclone, a much modified civilian Sikorsky. Most recently, the fantastic old Buffalo has been phased out after 50+ years of stellar service. Its replacement, the C-295 Kingfisher, has arrived, but with a list of either unacceptable features or yet-to-be sorted out mods (so it also went with the Cormorant). Somehow, each such fleet gradually has been sorted out. The main thing about DND procurement seems to be that Canada rarely acquires an airplane without massive gobs of time to contemplate and complicate everything, plus astounding (sometimes unjustified) over-spending.

When, lately, I spotted the wonderful old photo (above) of Richfield Oil’s NC13777, I was reminded of how the RCAF had acquired its first modern, all-metal airplane in 1936. Just then it needed a new type to replace its ancient Bellancas and Fairchilds of 1920s vintage. Somehow, RCAF engineering HQ learned of the Northrop, maybe simply by a salesman knocking at the door, or spotting a trade magazine advertisement or article. It looked like a good airplane, and (RCAF HQ soon learned) industrial and trade skills spinoffs were available. But the Delta was a civil design. The great Joseph P. Juptner describes it as “a highly advanced single-engined airliner, a speedy conveyance … for medium roads on the trunk airline routes”.

Unfortunately, TWA had cancelled its order for 15 Deltas when the US government ceased licencing single-engine airliners for night schedules. Northrop was left holding the bag, but the RCAF came to the rescue, buying three Deltas from Northrop’s surplus, then contracting with Canadian Vickers for licence production of 17 more. These served well into early WWII, then had extra duty into late the war as ground training aids. In the end, the RCAF saved Jack Northrop’s bacon by buying his orphan. In RCAF service, the Delta proved to be a solid, versatile plane. Meanwhile, it must be admitted that DND procurement can get things rolling in a hurry if necessary, not just with the Delta. Look how it acquired its fleets of C-17s and C-130Js – they seem to have come out of nowhere compared to the decades needed to replace the Sea King or Buffalo.

The first RCAF Delta at Canadian Vickers in Montreal before its delivery in September (CANAV Books Col.)
RCAF Delta 675 (left) at Vancouver, where No.1 Squadron recently had accepted 10 newly-arrived (by sea) Hurricanes. The Delta served here as a makeshift advanced trainer to give 1 Squadron’s pilots some time on a reasonably modern plane before trying out the Hurricane. The Delta had some similar features, but not a retractable undercarriage. This role illustrates how versatile the Delta could be. While acquired for aerial photography (at which it proved to be excellent), it also was a useful trainer, and flew many armed coastal patrols on the East Coast in the first year of WWII. It’s odd how the RCAF acquired this Northrop orphan and on the spur-of-the-moment. A plane was needed, RCAF engineering liked what it saw, some irresistible offer likely was made by Jack Northrop (“Have we got a deal for you.”) and the rest became history. Try pulling off something like that at DND procurement in 2022. This is thought to be a Gordon S. Williams photo.

Canada’s Hornets –Retrospective

CAF “Desert Cats” Hornets that I shot at Doha back in January 1991 during Gulf War I.

We fans started following the CF-18 Hornet back in 1982 and since then haven’t missed much about this exciting, ongoing episode in CAF/RCAF fighter history. My first chance to photograph Hornets was at Cold Lake in 1983. Since then I’ve chased them all over the place, and even had some backseat rides (starting at Baden-Soellingen in 1987). Other highlights were at Maple Flag at Cold Lake, various exciting events at Bagotville, fighter meets at Tyndall AFB, Langley AFB and Burlington, Vermont, a few days with 437 Sqn refuelling Canada’s last NATO Hornets between Lahr and Goose Bay via Keflavik, Doha for Gulf War I, and airshows from coast to coast. Another historic event occurred in 1993, while I was waiting at CFB Lahr to catch a Hercules back to Canada. There on the ramp sat a lone Hornet getting ready for departure. Here’s that story as it appeared in the November 1993 edition of “Wings” magazine.

Hornet 188761 has had a typically fascinating history. Having risen like a phoenix, it served on the line at Cold Lake and Bagotville, and from Bagotville was an airshow demo jet for three seasons. Here are three great Richard Girouard photos of ‘761 wearing its special airshow colours. This month ‘761 made the trip from 410 Squadron at Cold Lake to begin another tour at Bagotville. To date it has logged more than 4900 flying hours. As such it’s one of the RCAF’s “youngest” Hornets, certainly when compared to 787 at more than 8300. Theoretically, Canada’s Hornets are time-expired at about 10,000 hours. This is spectacular for any third or fourth generation Western fighter.
Canada’s Hornets continue to give solid service decades after the process started to find their replacement. So far our only “replacement” has been a batch of ancient RAAF Hornets, which the Aussies put out to pasture starting in 2018, when they started taking delivery of their 72 F-35s. One consolation for Canada? When it ordered the Hornet more than 40 years ago, DND made the best possible choice.

Harsh Realities in Space Flight

Terranauts … here’s an important Space Program retrospective. The topic is melancholic, but needs to be contemplated to have a realistic sense of where we’ve been and where we’re going tomorrow in space exploration. Chris and Helene Hadfield are the guests. Google this: We remember – A special episode of Terranauts with Helene …

Scrolling Back

You’ll never run out of solid history to read or photos to enjoy on our blog (which dates back to 2009). What are your interests? Here are some of the worthwhile topics you can find in a flash via the search box or by scrolling back through the years:

440 Squadron Gets Together in Ottawa
A History of Austin Airways
Aircraft of the USAF Museum
Antonov AN-124
Apollo 40 th Anniversary
Beech 18 Boeing 727 Turns 50
C-119 The Travels of Nick and Larry
Canada’s Enduring DC-3s
Canadian Fighter Pilots Association
Canadian Forces in Ethiopia, Somalia and Rwanda
Canso
CF-104 Warbird Emerges
Dash 8 No.1000 Is Delivered
Fox Moth Discoveries
From the Wilf White Collection
Homebuilding Roots in Canada
Last Lockheed Jetstar Retires
Light Planes
Lockheed Lodestar
More CF-TGE Nostalgia
Norseman
Northern Aviation in 1977
Old Canadair Originals
Postwar Adverts
Super Connie Field Trip
The Crash of CF-100 18417
The Great Bob Halford
The Great War Flying Museum
Toronto/Winnipeg Turn-Around
Winter Photography

Next Time on the CANAV Blog?

I’ll be rolling out some more of my prehistoric black-and-white shots of the great corporate planes of the 1950s. Emphasis on the amazing Douglas B-23 Dragon. Here’s a teaser – Dragon N34C.

Have a close look at our promo sheet for CANAV’s grand history of CAE Inc. of Montreal. If you pride yourself in having a serious Canadian aviation home library, The CAE Story belongs in it. There isn’t a more wide-ranging aerospace history book with this depth of coverage anywhere in the world, nor a more beautifully-produced book at such a bargain price.

TTC Winter Photography in Years Gone By

Since we’ve had a very snowy winter here in Toronto this year, I got thinking about winter photography in years gone by. I was further encouraged by Pierre Gillard’s recent winter aviation photography at St. Hubert — see http://www.pierregillard.com/blog/index.html This is not to be missed!

First, here’s a January 1976 scene from the bad old days of the Queen St. East morning commute. Well do we remember packing ourselves onto such PCCs as 4690. Talk about the wretched lives of sardines, eh! Then, 4449 rounding the loop at Neville Park on January 15, 1968 ready to battle its way on another cross-town Queen Street grind. Finally for this trio … PPCs 4230 and 4309 stored at the Wychwood Barns as I spotted them on December 6, 1969.

Old Magazines Are Real Treasures

There is no more fun with the printed page than flipping through old magazines reading the articles and perusing the wonderful old advertisements. Lately, I spotted these two wonderful old “adverts” in “The Aeroplane” from 1955 — one featuring the Viscount for TCA, the other the Avro CF-100. The first one illustrates the heyday of the UK’s post-WWII aviation industry; the second — Canada’s at its peak, a time when such other types as the Beaver, Otter, Tracker and Argus all were coming off the lines. Canada was at the top of its aviation industry game. For more such delightful reading, see our earlier item “Postwar Adverts”.

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